Sunday, September 18, 2005

Debunking Myths on Stephen Harper (Part 1)

Once again, Stephen Harper's leadership has come under attack. And again its from the usual suspects. The Liberal-Left, many self-described Red Tories, so-called Libertarians, and of course the MSM.

Now due to the whole hoopla over the past few weeks on Stephen Harper's leadership, I too decided to re-evaluate and re-think the whole leadership situation within the CPC. However, after much thought and online research, I really couldn't find one criticism that really has any facts backing the theory up of his so-called "Leadership deficiencies". What are those criticisms, let's go through them:

Myth Number 1: Harper is a Social Conservative:
This is one thing that is repeated very often (and communicated very efficiently) despite any rock solid evidence backing this up. When you take a look at Harper's previous occupations and opinions on matters, you can't find any single piece that really ties him to "Social Conservatism".

-I doubt that any opinions on abortion, gays, women's rights, divorce or school prayer would have come in handy in a Economics course in the U. of Calgary (where he lectured).

-The National Citizens Coalition has not once commented on Social Issues. As a matter of fact all their works/lobbying are concentrated on Financial matters, Military policy and Gag Laws. (If there is anyone out there that has evidence to the contrary to this, then please send it to me).

-On the matter of Abortion, again the so-called theories that he's somehow anti-abortion also lacks evidence. He has stated his opposition to Abortion legislation in the Policy Convention last March and the members of the CPC have indeed voted on the matter that no legislation be brought forth regarding the issue. Yet this has fallen on deaf ears. The myth is very popular among many political junkies.

-According to this
Harper was among the dissident reformers under Preston Manning Leadership on the issue of homosexuality

"The wrong Right [at national convention of Reform Party in October 1994, 87 percent of delegates voted in favor of legislating heterosexual-only definition of marriage; after vote, Stephen Harper and Jan Brown criticized party's decision to refuse equality to gays/lesbians; Paul Holmes, a 21-year-old delegate also disagreed; etc.].
P93 (v12n8)(Dec. 7, 1994): 23 (25cm.)
"



Also on the issue of Gay Marriage his critics run into a sticky situation. I'm fully aware that there are people who view bill C-38 as a matter of human-rights and equality. And that Harper's legislation on the matter (Civil Unions, Marriage be strictly defined as a union between man and woman) is downright bigoted and intolerant.

While I disagree with that assessment I will respect it. HOWEVER, I cannot stomach the double-standard that's at play here. If you truly believe that the CPC's position on Bill C-38 is bigoted, does that mean that you also believe that Gay Marriage laws in Sweden, France, The UK, Denmark, Norway, Finland, Germany and New Zeeland (whom ALL have similar positions to the CPC on the matter) to be human-rights abusers?

Are you making any substantial effort to unseat the 30 or so Liberal MP's who voted down the bill? Do you believe that Bev Desjardins is an intolerant women who doesn't care about minority rights?

If your the type of person who marches in protest whenever PM Göran Persson visits Ottawa, or calls for economic sanctions against France over their "human-rights" position or scream at Carolyn Parish of living in the Stone Age, power to you! If you don't, then friend, no offense, but your a Fu*king hypocrite.

(Tomorow, Part 2: Harper is displaying poor leadership).

10 Comments:

At Sunday, 18 September, 2005, Anonymous Anonymous said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

 
At Sunday, 18 September, 2005, Blogger v said...

Great article, AK!

 
At Sunday, 18 September, 2005, Blogger Meaghan Walker-Williams said...

You are aware, I hope that Harper's first few years in Ottawa as an MP and high-up player, directing much of the policy, was for the Reform Party... which did not even allow people from Quebec or Ontario to become members.

And this is a surprise to people that to this day, Quebec and Ontarians still reject Harper.. regardless of what he's calling himself these days?

I mean.. come on... Think about it.
He's fine for a regional party, but he will never get acceptance back East. It's just never gonna happen.

That's perhaps unfair to him... but life is unfair.

 
At Sunday, 18 September, 2005, Blogger The Arabian Knight said...

"You are aware, I hope that Harper's first few years in Ottawa as an MP and high-up player, directing much of the policy, was for the Reform Party... which did not even allow people from Quebec or Ontario to become members"

Ouch...careful there Meaghan, one of the first Reform MP's was Gallant from...Ontario. As for the lack of candidates in the East, well that was mainly die to the fact that the Reform party was still in its begginings. Same thing happned with the NDP when they first came out.

BTW, what the hell does this have to do with Harper being a Social Conservative?

 
At Sunday, 18 September, 2005, Blogger Jarrett said...

I just think it's awesome that you dredged up that old quote from the Reform era.

And guess what? Isn't this cool... I happen to know that once-"21-year-old Paul Holmes". He's now a proud dad and the president of the EDA in the riding of Victoria (BC).

 
At Sunday, 18 September, 2005, Blogger The Arabian Knight said...

And guess what? Isn't this cool... I happen to know that once-"21-year-old Paul Holmes". He's now a proud dad and the president of the EDA in the riding of Victoria (BC).

Cool! Thanks Jarett.

 
At Monday, 19 September, 2005, Anonymous Anonymous said...

"Ouch...careful there Meaghan, one of the first Reform MP's was Gallant from...Ontario. As for the lack of candidates in the East, well that was mainly die to the fact that the Reform party was still in its begginings. Same thing happned with the NDP when they first came out."

Ahem...

rassroots party members oppose eastern expansion
The Daily News (Halifax)
Sunday, April 7, 1991
Byline: By PATRICK NAGLE, Southam News
SASKATOON THE REFORM Party is deciding its future this weekend with delegates split about whether to expand the party's ranks into eastern Canada. While the convention decided yesterday to go along with the views of leader Preston Manning and agreed to circulate a mail referendum ballot to all party members on the question of expanding into provinces east of Manitoba, some Reformers are opposed. Fearing the party is about to walk away from its founding slogan -- "The West Wants In" -- they are preparing to fight for the party's grass- roots. "If you haven't got grassroots you haven't got a party," says Alberta delegate Victor Wiebe. "Some of us are strongly opposed to the idea of letting the party get out of the West." One proposal that was to be discussed would give the party leadership a say in choosing candidates -- and thus groom the party for success in national politics. Members of Alberta's Wild Rose constituency oppose any such interference in candidate selection. "Wild Rose takes the position it is the exclusive right of the members of . .. each constituency to choose the candidate they will nominate and support," says a riding statement. "This right goes to the very root of our democratic system and the Reform Party principle of the supremacy of the people." Behind the controversial proposal lies a desire by Manning for executive supervision of radical elements in the party. "We don't want to be seen as fringe, we don't want to be seen as marginal," Manning says. "We want to be seen as mainstream in the national arena." The mainstream, a party study has discovered, is in Ontario, a province where the Reform Party has yet to become officially active. Stephen Harper, the party's chief policy officer, believes the timing is right to bring Ontario into an alliance with western Canada. "Quebec is cracking the constitutional situation wide open," Harper says. "A large number of Ontarians are seeing the historic power alliance of the country is finished. "Their province and their region cannot cut a realistic deal with Quebec and if they're going to save the country they're going to have to take a look at patching up some of the other fault lines." Reform executives say they have already recruited approximately 5,000 Ontario members. Manning has scheduled a Toronto fundraiser for the second week of June for which 3,000 tickets have already been sold.If the party rejects Ontario's application for participation there will be no point in Manning showing up for the Toronto dinner. George Shaw of West Vancouver, who has studied the Ontario question for the party during the past year, said the membership vote was bound to be "a bit controversial" given the party's genesis in western political alienation. "By becoming a national party, we'll have more clout, we'll be able to achieve our objectives more quickly and more realistically as a national party than we could ever do so purely as a western regional party," Shaw says. "If we want to speak for Canada, the time is now. There is an opportunity now. The country is begging for some leadership."

 
At Tuesday, 20 September, 2005, Blogger The Arabian Knight said...

It would help if you actually read the the pasted text:

Stephen Harper, the party's chief policy officer, believes the timing is right to bring Ontario into an alliance with western Canada. "Quebec is cracking the constitutional situation wide open," Harper says. "A large number of Ontarians are seeing the historic power alliance of the country is finished. "Their province and their region cannot cut a realistic deal with Quebec and if they're going to save the country they're going to have to take a look at patching up some of the other fault lines."


So...what was that about Harper not wanting to reach out to the east again?

 
At Tuesday, 20 September, 2005, Blogger Scott A. said...

Yep, I love it when people don't read the entire text of the article. Harper wanted the Reform Party not to be a regionalized party, but a fully national conservative-based party. And as for Harper being a social conservative, he's not. He is, and always has been, a fiscal conservative. A great source of information about Harper and the history of the whole Reform/Alliance/CPC movement is "Stephen Harper and the Future of Canada" by William Johnson.

 
At Thursday, 15 July, 2010, Anonymous Anonymous said...

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